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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3X98C

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Physiology and morphology of epithelia in the freshwater demosponge, Spongilla lacustris Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
metazoa
sponge
evolution
epithelia
porifera
invertebrate
Spongilla lacustris
occusion junctions
Transepithelial Resistance
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Adams, Emily
Supervisor and department
Leys, Sally (Biological Sciences)
Examining committee member and department
Leys, Sally (Biological Sciences)
Gallin, Warren (Biological Sciences)
Cheeseman, Chris (Physiology)
Goss, Greg (Biological Sciences)
Department
Department of Biological Sciences
Specialization

Date accepted
2010-09-17T16:01:54Z
Graduation date
2010-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Epithelia form protective barriers and regulate molecule transport between the mesenchyme and environment. Amongst all metazoans, only sponges are said to lack 'true' epithelia however the physiology of sponge cell layers are rarely studied empirically. Aggregates and gemmules of a freshwater demosponge, Spongilla lacustris, were used to grow confluent tissue over permeable culture wells which are required for transepithelial recordings. The transepithelial potential (TEP) of S. lacustris was slightly negative (-3mV), indicating possible control of ion transport. Transepithelial resistance (TER) was recorded between 1-2 k Ωcm2, the same order of magnitude as many vertebrate epithelia. Cultures with high resistance blocked the passage of the small tracer molecules 14C-PEG, 3H-Inulin and ruthenium red. Pinacocytes were spatially stable over time and epithelial layers were morphologically similar in freshwater and marine species. These results suggest that sponge cell layers are able to control solute and ion transport, the physiological attributes of functional epithelia.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3X98C
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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