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Images of Research Competition 2017

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  1. Body as a Home [Download]

    Title: Body as a Home
    Creator: Burger, Camille
    Description: This piece is dedicated to my friend Nadia Vera, a Mexican dancer, activist and anthropologist who was murdered in the summer of 2015 in Mexico City. She strongly believed in the potential for arts as a medium for social transformation and acted accordingly. My PhD (research and creation) places focus on indigenous rituals, indigenous methodologies and performing art. I created this thesis piece – La distancia que nos aproxima - at the Arts Based Research Studio here at the University of Alberta. Here I explore an underscore of jumps & voice, finding a physical and emotional engagement in a resilient/explosive/alive body. In this piece I ask, how can we continue to dance with a missing part of us - with our grief, with our sadness – and transform it? How can we continue even more to collaborate, to create a human web of solidarity through art - even if some part of US disappears? This picture was taken by one of my close collaborators (Jenny Abouav) as I was jumping in front of a blue square projection. My body is dissolving into the light, losing its human shape, transformed in an abstract landscape. Multiplied. // Program of Study: PhD // Faculty/Department: Drama // Place of creation: University of Alberta // Award: Honourable Mention Prize, Images of Research Competition 2017
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    Date Created: 2017
  2. Resolution 2 [Download]

    Title: Resolution 2
    Creator: Pohlod , Meghan
    Description: I am a visual artist working in print media and installation practices examining the body as interior and exterior space in order to question what happens with traumatic memory when triggered by image, place and time. I am concerned with the trauma of abandonment and desire to understand my own story through exploration of recollections, confrontations and resolutions. I work from the premise that intimate phenomenological events trigger trace memories that create imprints in the psyche. I believe that traceable memory recollected is unstable and not always recognizable the same way twice. In moments of recollected trauma triggered by image, the body can physically react and habitual body patterns can literally force the memory within us to respond in some way. I incorporate different kinds of tactile printed mark; for me this drawn imagery is a way of introducing my subjective experience, reflecting on the cognitive and physical stressors of abandonment trauma. // Program of Study: Master's // Faculty/Department: Art & Design, Printmaking // Place of creation: University of Alberta // Award: Semi-finalist Prize, Images of Research Competition 2017
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    Date Created: 2017
  3. Frozen Kaleidoscope [Download]

    Title: Frozen Kaleidoscope
    Creator: McFarlane, Vincent
    Description: Frazil ice particles form in the turbulent supercooled waters of northern rivers prior to freeze-up. The individual particles suspended in the flow are primarily disc-shaped, very small (maximum of ~4 mm in diameter), and upon contact with each other will freeze together into complex formations called flocs. Shown here is a frazil floc approximately 1.1 cm tall and 1.8 cm wide composed of many individual particles. This image was captured as part of a study into the size distribution and concentration of suspended frazil ice particles at different stages of the frazil ice formation process and under different turbulent flow conditions. The particles were produced in a continuously mixed tank of water in the Civil Engineering cold room laboratory and photographed as they passed between two cross-polarising filters. Any light passing through the ice particles was refracted and shows up bright and colourful in the images, while the un-refracted background light became blacked out. This produced an image with very high contrast and ideal for image processing, but also resulted in the beautiful kaleidoscope-like effect shown here. The scale of this image is 2.8 √ó 4.1 cm. // Program of Study: PhD // Faculty/Department: Civil and Environmental Engineering // Place of creation: U of A Civil Engineering Cold Room Laboratory // Award: Semi-finalist Prize, Images of Research Competition 2017
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    Date Created: 2017
  4. Sundial - Indigenous ways of knowledge and knowing [Download]

    Title: Sundial - Indigenous ways of knowledge and knowing
    Creator: Lafferty, Anita
    Description: Through the sundial, the images tell the story of my notions of knowledge and knowing as an interpolation of the third space, shared through a Dene and Cree lens. Like the blind spot that exists within the means of the eye, the ethos of my understanding of curriculum aspects are shared through the images of the sundial. The images represent the interpolation of the third space as each identifies an epistemological, political, ideological, aesthetic, ethical, and historical inquiry that challenges the content of our current curriculum to include authentic Indigenous pedagogy. The sundial represents the methodological narrative in its 'temporal space' but as the story shifts through the sundial, it is ever changing and will do so as an ongoing element of nature, time, and place. My research will continue to explore this narrative from an Indigenous perspective drawn from my own experiences revealed through poetic and artistic elements. The emergence of a new paradigm for Indigenous curriculum involves amalgamating the current system with new data points that are interconnected with Indigenous worldviews and allow resistance to assimilative epistemologies. // Program of Study: PhD // Faculty/Department: Secondary Education // Place of creation: The image was taken of an art piece I created for EDSE 610 (Advanced Research) at the University of Alberta // Award: Semi-finalist Prize, Images of Research Competition 2017
    Subjects: Indigenous knowledge
    Date Created: 2017
  5. Colourful but unwanted changes in the muscle of cancer patients [Download]

    Title: Colourful but unwanted changes in the muscle of cancer patients
    Creator: Anoveros, Ana
    Description: During cancer, patients lose a significant amount of muscle mass. This is associated with poor outcomes and increased mortality rates. Muscle is composed of different types of muscle fibers (also called muscle cells): slow muscle fibers are meant for endurance activities and fast muscle fibers for quick movements. Importantly, muscle loss has been associated with changes in this fiber types, accompanied by the shifting of slow fibers to fast fibers or vice versa. In my project, I am characterizing the different fiber types in the muscle of cancer patients to understand how this element affects whole muscle mass. This image illustrates a colourful experiment that allows us to visualize different types of muscle fibers based on a fluorescent stain and confocal microscopy. The light and dark green colours represents fast muscle fibers and the yellow colour slow muscle fibers. This technique enables us to evaluate the proportions of fast and slow muscle fibers, grouping pattern of similar fiber types and overall size and shape of muscle fibers which may translate as an underlying muscle pathology that influences muscle loss in the cancer population. // Program of Study: PhD // Faculty/Department: Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science // Place of creation: Cell Imaging Centre, University of Alberta // Award: Semi-finalist Prize, Images of Research Competition 2017
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    Date Created: 2017
  6. Divers cullort ribbans': material evidence from the archives [Download]

    Title: Divers cullort ribbans': material evidence from the archives
    Creator: Sims, Ashley
    Description: Historians rely overwhelmingly on written sources as their principal evidence. They then take that evidence and add more text, using layers of interpretation, analysis, and argument in order to examine and explain past events. My doctoral dissertation explores consumer behaviour in 17th-century Scotland via documents that people created while going about their everyday lives. I use diaries and journals, household account books, receipts and letters in order to understand how average Scots lived their material lives. This photograph highlights a rare occurrence in my research program: an instance in which textual and material evidence exist in a single source. This letter was written in 1660 by a woman in Edinburgh to a cloth merchant in London requesting ‘1 ell’ or 46cm of a specific red velvet ribbon. Generally I can only imagine the particulars of the desired goods or hope something similar has survived in a museum collection. However, since the writer decided to include a cutting of the ribbon 357 years ago I am now able to gain direct access to the object itself, further connecting modern historian and historical figure. This photograph captures a moment of discovery and shows just how familiar and accessible the past can be. // Program of Study: PhD // Faculty/Department: History and Classics // Place of creation: Edinburgh, Scotland // Award: Honourable Mention Prize, Images of Research Competition 2017
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    Date Created: 2017
  7. Story teller tendrils [Download]

    Title: Story teller tendrils
    Creator: Kahlon, Jagroop Gill
    Description: My current PhD research focuses on environmental biosafety of transgenic pea (Pisum sativum L.). We are testing the efficacy of transgenic disease pea against fungal pathogens in comparison to the non-transgenic pea in confined field trials. When we have to compare transgenic lines, we not only have to focus on the trait under question but also have to take into account various agronomic characteristics including morphological differences that may not seem relevant right way but will tell you a story later or help you, as a connecting link of the story, you want to tell. This particular image depicts the arrangement of tendrils of pea on a transgenic line, which had little more curling in the whorls at the end than the other lines. Is this indication of some off type? Or is this a new mutation that has randomly occurred during the transformation process? Or is this a trait that perhaps was recessive, sitting unexpressed in the parents or grandparents of this line? A careful observation and spending some time with the plants in the field while they are growing- will have a story to tell… like these tendrils. // Program of Study: PhD // Faculty/Department: Agricultural Food and Nutritional Science // Place of creation: Crop Diversification Center, Edmonton, Alberta // Award: Semi-finalist Prize, Images of Research Competition 2017
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    Date Created: 2017
  8. Wonder-trail in Blue and Yellow [Download]

    Title: Wonder-trail in Blue and Yellow
    Creator: de Bruijn, Noemi
    Description: My work/research focuses on our relationship with the environment. I'm concerned with what I call nature-culture dislocation. This relates to how we have distanced and mediated ourselves as a culture from the realities of the planet we live on. We curate everything that surrounds us, and photography is a great example of how this presents itself in modern life. I use photographs taken by myself or others and then work into them using print, painting, or drawing media. I also draw inspiration from topographical maps. I find that the contrast of art and science languages reflect the dislocation I speak of in my research. I enjoy to further exemplify this through altering the horizon lines of the landscape, hopefully enticing the viewer to have a second look and to reconsider what they are seeing in the imagery. For that moment I feel that I have achieved a reconnection to the landscape and the land, and that (I feel) makes my work worthwhile. // Program of Study: Master's // Faculty/Department: Art & Design // Place of creation: Image taken at Abraham Lake, Alberta and developed at the University of Alberta // Award: Third Prize Prize, Images of Research Competition 2017
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    Date Created: 2017
  9. Northern Ecosystem Change: Burning & Thawing [Download]

    Title: Northern Ecosystem Change: Burning & Thawing
    Creator: Gibson, Carolyn
    Description: Each summer as air temperatures rise amongst the midnight sun, permafrost begins to thaw top down. This thawing is short lived though as fall’s cool breath begins to show itself in late August and these soils refreeze as the long winter sets in. Understanding what controls the depth of this top down thaw can tell us about future permafrost stability. In this photo our undergraduate field assistant measures the depth of this seasonally unfrozen permafrost layer within a site that has experienced wildfire. As part of my Master’s thesis I am exploring how wildfire affects permafrost stability within the discontinuous permafrost zone. Ongoing permafrost thaw not only impacts carbon storage capabilities, it also threatens infrastructure stability, vital habitat for subsistence resources, and increases the risk of downstream flooding. My research is the first to propose an estimate of fire accelerated thaw which is crucial as current studies that have suggested rates of permafrost thaw have neglected accelerated thaw due to wildfire, despite the known increases in frequency and extent of wildfire that is projected for the next century. The simple action of pushing a probe into the ground, as depicted in this photo, can tell us so much! // Program of Study: Master's // Faculty/Department: Renewable Resources // Place of creation: Lutose, Alberta // Award: Semi-finalist Prize, Images of Research Competition 2017
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    Date Created: 2017
  10. A Proton Flower from the Titan Laser [Download]

    Title: A Proton Flower from the Titan Laser
    Creator: Kerr, Shaun
    Description: When an ultra-intense laser hits a solid target, jets of particles stream off in all directions. Hydrogen, as the lightest element, gets preferentially accelerated, resulting in proton beams. These beams have many potential applications, from medical radiotherapy to fusion energy. The study of their dynamics and optimization has been the focus of my degree. In this false colour image, a beam of protons has been recorded by radiochromic film. The protons were moving at 10% the speed of light. The intense fields of the laser, along with the magnetic fields generated by expanding plasma, lead to a distinctive ring structure. Meanwhile, magnetic field instabilities cause filamentation of the particle beam and the clearly visible line features. The colour set chosen, “fire”, is the standard used by experimentalists in the field to highlight features in data. // Program of Study: PhD // Faculty/Department: Electrical and Computer Engineering // Place of creation: Jupiter Laser Facility, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, California, United States // Award: Semi-finalist Prize, Images of Research Competition 2017
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    Date Created: 2017