ERA

Occupational Therapy

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  1. Psychometric properties of the performing arts module of the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire [Download]

    Title: Psychometric properties of the performing arts module of the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire
    Creator: Baadjou, V.
    Description: Background: The Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire (DASH) offers an optional performing arts module. The goal was to examine the psychometric properties of this module in musicians. Methods: This study is a secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial on the effectiveness of a biopsychosocial intervention to prevent or reduce playing-related disability in conservatory students. Baseline data were used to examine internal consistency and discriminative validity of the performing arts module of the DASH questionnaire. Construct validity was analyzed by hypotheses testing. The performing arts module outcomes were compared to scores from the general DASH questionnaire, pain disability index, Short-Form 36, playing-related musculoskeletal disorder (PRMD) intensity, and pain intensity. Results: Questionnaires completed by 130 conservatory students were analyzed, 55% of the population was female. Median age was 20 years (IQR 4). The performing arts module showed good internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha 0.893). Discriminative validity between students with and without PRMDs was good. Three out of six hypotheses were accepted, indicating moderate construct validity. Conclusions: The performing arts module showed good internal consistency, good discriminative validity and moderate construct validity in a population of conservatory students. • Implications for Rehabilitation • Musicians suffer frequently from musculoskeletal disorders, mostly in the upper extremity. • The Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire is a well-known outcome measure, which also includes a performing arts module. • This study is the first to explore psychometric properties of the performing arts module. • The performing arts module of the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire showed good internal consistency, good discriminative validity, and moderate construct validity.
    Subjects: Disability, validity, playing- related musculoskeletal disorder, musculoskeletal, music, upper extremity
    Date Created: 2017/08/16
  2. Why Music Majors Pursue Music Despite the Risk of Playing-related Injuries [Download]

    Title: Why Music Majors Pursue Music Despite the Risk of Playing-related Injuries
    Creator: Park, Anna
    Description: Music is an occupation that has existed across cultures and societies for millennia. What music means and how it is used differ depending on the context of an individual’s life. University music majors often pursue music as a future career goal, despite the fact that playing-related injuries are a significant risk for this population and could end their careers. The purpose of this study was to investigate why university music majors pursue music despite the risk of playing- related injuries. This qualitative study used a naturalistic approach and focus groups to collect data. Nine students participated in two focus group sessions. The data were transcribed verbatim and analyzed for themes. The results of the study indicate that both personal and environmental factors influence the participants’ decision to continue to participate in music. Some students also were willing to play through pain, which is contrary to Maslow’s theory of human needs, and many students experienced difficulties accessing desirable health care. Although an injury could terminate a student’s ability to participate in music, the occupation of music itself transcended this danger. For several musicians, quitting was not a desirable option. These findings have clinical implications for health care workers with respect to modifying treatment to address musicians’ specialized needs. Occupational therapists use a holistic and client-centered approach to care and offer interventions such as compensatory techniques, assistive devices, and methods of energy conservation that may facilitate continuing with this valued occupation.
    Subjects: Music, playing-related njuries, risk
    Date Created: 2007
  3. Behavioural Supports Alberta (BSA) Symposium Report 2014: Building Capacity and Sustainability for Behavioural Supports Alberta (BSA): The train's leaving the station - let's keep it on the tracks! [Download]

    Title: Behavioural Supports Alberta (BSA) Symposium Report 2014: Building Capacity and Sustainability for Behavioural Supports Alberta (BSA): The train's leaving the station - let's keep it on the tracks!
    Creator: Bremault-Phillips, Suzette
    Description: Symposium Report
    Subjects: Responsive Behaviours, Behavioural Supports Alberta, BPSD, BSA
    Date Created: 2014/03/28
  4. Final Report to ACCTI: Mental Health Education Support for Healthcare Frontline Workers in a Rural Continuing Care Setting [Download]

    Title: Final Report to ACCTI: Mental Health Education Support for Healthcare Frontline Workers in a Rural Continuing Care Setting
    Creator: Craig Hart
    Subjects: mental health, caregiver, education
    Date Created: 2012/09/28
  5. Pain Resources for Young People [Download]

    Title: Pain Resources for Young People
    Creator: Brown, Cary A
    Description: A pamphlet listing user friendly resources for children with pain
    Subjects: self-management, pain, youth, children, health literacy
  6. Community re-integration [Download]

    Title: Community re-integration
    Creator: Elizabeth Taylor
    Subjects: community mental health
  7. Assessment of Decision-Making Capacity in Adults with Diseases and Disabilities: Is the Decision-Making Capacity Assessment Model Appropriate for Alberta? - Final Report February 2012 - March 2012 [Download]

    Title: Assessment of Decision-Making Capacity in Adults with Diseases and Disabilities: Is the Decision-Making Capacity Assessment Model Appropriate for Alberta? - Final Report February 2012 - March 2012
    Creator: Bremault-Phillips, Suzette
    Description: EXECUTIVE SUMMARY An evaluation was conducted of the Decision-Making Capacity Assessment Model (DMCA Model). The DMCA Model was developed in the Province of Alberta to provide guidance and support to health care professionals working with clients whose ability to make independent decisions regarding personal affairs (classified according to the domains of health care, place of residence, choice of friends and acquaintances, legal matters, and participation in social, educational or employment activities), and/or financial matters is in question as a result of disease or disability. The aim of the evaluation was to determine the strengths and limitations of the Model. To evaluate the DMCA Model, feedback was collected from health care professionals (psychologists, social workers, nurse practitioners, nurses, occupational therapists, physicians), who have utilized the Model as it has been implemented in various health care sites in the Edmonton and Calgary areas. Staff feedback was collected through focus groups with mentoring team members and court-appointed Designated Capacity Assessors (DCAs), as well as through a survey administered to attending and mentoring team members, and DCAs at participating sites . Evaluation results based on the 46 focus group participants and 123 survey respondents indicate that the DMCA Model currently utilized in the Calgary and Edmonton areas is effective and warrants being implemented - with adaptation specific to various sites - throughout the province of Alberta. While other models have been utilized elsewhere, the DMCA Model currently being utilized and implemented in Calgary and Edmonton offers an holistic inter-disciplinary approach to capacity assessment that maximizes client autonomy, offers the least restrictive and intrusive solutions, and facilitates collaboration between health care professionals within and among health care facilities/agencies.
    Subjects: Assessment, Capacity, Cognitive decline, Adult cognition, Decision Making
    Date Created: 2012/06/01
  8. Community Re-integration of Forensic Clients with Persistent, Chronic Mental Illnesses: A Retrospective Evaluation of Life Skills Training Programs Provided Through the House Next Door Society Residential Services [Download]

    Title: Community Re-integration of Forensic Clients with Persistent, Chronic Mental Illnesses: A Retrospective Evaluation of Life Skills Training Programs Provided Through the House Next Door Society Residential Services
    Creator: Elizabeth Taylor
    Description: Facilitating the re-integration of forensic clients with severe, persistent chronic mental illnesses (complex psychiatric conditions, developmental delay, traumatic brain injuries, cognitive disorders, chronic psychiatric conditions, and personality disorders) into the community requires specialized support, programming, and services. The House Next Door (HND) is a community-based, non-profit society aimed at meeting the needs of this specialized population and supporting their transition into the community. In existence since 1974, the staff and programs of HND have enabled upwards of approximately 3000 individuals to successfully re-enter society. HND operates several programs for the severe and persistently mentally ill, with their forensic community program being the largest. Despite its success in facilitating effective transition, and the reliance of both Alberta Health Services (AHS) and Alberta Health on the services offered through HND, a specific program evaluation of the forensic program has not been conducted. The purpose of this research project was to conduct a program evaluation with the aim of determining the efficacy of service delivery in support of this complex population. Interviews and focus groups were completed with AHS staff, HND 2 and 4 staff, and current residents and outreach clients of HND 2. Results indicate that HND 2 provides effective transitional services to the community, although increased funding would provide additional resources, such as more facilities and program, increased staffing, and additional staff training. While the current model is viewed as effective, there are concerns with safety of staff when working alone, and a broadly voiced desire for additional programming that could be implemented if funding were in place to allow the program to further expand.
    Subjects: community mental health, House Next Door Society, mental illness, transition, life skills training, forensic
    Date Created: 2015/01/09
  9. The lived experience of professional musicians with playing-related injuries: A phenomenological inquiry [Download]

    Title: The lived experience of professional musicians with playing-related injuries: A phenomenological inquiry
    Creator: Guptill, Christine A.
    Description: The purpose of this study was to understand the lived experience of professional instrumental musicians who have experienced playing-related injuries. The study used a hermeneutic phenomenological methodology developed to examine this lived experience. In-depth interviews were conducted with 10 professional musicians, followed by a focus group where preliminary findings were presented to participants and their feedback was sought. Other sources of lived experience included participant-observation by the researcher, who is a musician and has experienced injuries, and biographic and artistic representations of musical performance and its loss, including literature, films, and television. The findings were summarized in a visual representation unique to this study. The representation illustrates three roles—musician, worker, and teacher—that are participated in, and disrupted by, the experience of being injured. In addition, the experience of a playing-related injury takes place within the context of a healthcare system which was perceived as insufficient to meet their needs: specialized care was rarely available and, if available, was not local or timely; treatment operated on a fee-for-service model when many musicians had meagre incomes and lacked coverage for these services; and treatment provided often failed to allow musicians to continue to perform at the level they had previously achieved. Finally, the representation illustrated four existentials— lived time, space, body and social relations—that permeated the experience. This study suggests that improvements to healthcare delivery and education of musicians, music teachers, and healthcare professionals are needed.
    Subjects: musician, injury, phenomenology
    Date Created: 2011
  10. Advancing Behavioural Supports Alberta (BSA) A Secondary Data Analysis of the November 21st, 2012 Challenging/Responsive Behaviours Symposium: Developing An Alberta Action Plan [Download]

    Title: Advancing Behavioural Supports Alberta (BSA) A Secondary Data Analysis of the November 21st, 2012 Challenging/Responsive Behaviours Symposium: Developing An Alberta Action Plan
    Creator: Bremault-Phillips, Suzette
    Description: Purpose of the Report The purpose of this report is to communicate summary findings of relevant themes and recommendations identified through a secondary analysis of the November 21, 2012 Challenging/Responsive Behaviours Symposium. The aim is to inform the development of a provincial action plan and network. The report will function as a broad level scan of system issues and potential solutions associated with the management of responsive behaviours.
    Subjects: Analysis, Behaviour Management, Behavioural Supports Alberta, Symposium
    Date Created: 2013/12/02