ERA

Circumpolar Collection

Items in this Collection
  1. Exploring Diversified Strategies for Co-operative Management of Forests by a First Nation and the Province of Alberta

    Title: Exploring Diversified Strategies for Co-operative Management of Forests by a First Nation and the Province of Alberta
    Creator: Naotaka Hayashi
    Description: While the boreal forests in northern Alberta have rich natural resources, which assure economic development for regional and provincial finances, for Aboriginal people living there, the forests have played a pivotal role in continuing their traditional subsistence based on hunting and gathering. In Canada, about eighty percent of Aboriginal people live in the forested area; and therefore, forests are indispensable for sustaining Aboriginal cultures and societies. Among First Nations in northern Alberta, the Little Red River Cree Nation (LRRCN) was the first to begin the management of their boreal forests in the form of co-operation with governments and the forestry sector. With this, the Nation has gained a timber harvest permit and runs a forestry operation along with private forest companies within their traditional territories. Aboriginal participation into the global capitalist economy will be a means to create job opportunities within the community, to regain control over their traditional relationship with the land, to contribute to conserve the ecological integrity of the forests, and ultimately to sustain the community as such. However, researches to this date reveal problems that industrial forestry can be incongruent with Aboriginal uses of the forest and sustainability of the forests. High Conservation Value Forest (HCVF), including carbon credits and certification, will serve to reduce the contractual burden (e.g. volumes of timber harvest) and to diversify strategies of forest management.
    Subjects: sustainable forest management, co-management, high conservation value forest (HCVF), carbon credit, TRIAD, Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), traditional land use (TLU), Cree, Treaty rights
    Date Created: 2004/12/05
  2. The Indigenous Roots Within Canadian Soil

    Title: The Indigenous Roots Within Canadian Soil
    Creator: Anna Wilson MEd.
    Description: The Indigenous Roots within Canadian Soil This poster answers the question \"How can educators motivate students to learn Aboriginal languages?\" The answer is to return to the original Aboriginal names of Canada's provinces and territories before European contact enabling Aboriginal students to reclaim their ancestors' rightful place in Canadian history. This answer is supported by the following concepts: 1. We must learn the Indigenous names of the land to learn how to be better stewards of the land. “In Cree Canada means the land that is clean” (Cardinal, 1951, p.3). Skutnabb-Kangas (2001) argues that the preservation of global linguistic diversity is essential to ecological biodiversity (p. 208). 2. Indigenous languages must be de-stigmatized to inspire Aboriginal students to learn them. 3. Learning the Aboriginal names of the Canadian provinces and territories prior to European contact is a good way to increase Aboriginal pride for Aboriginal lands using Aboriginal languages. For centuries, the names described the natural features of the land, or commemorated significant historical events, passed from one generation to the next. Many of these names still survive today. Many Canadian towns, cities, rivers and mountains also have names that come from Aboriginal sources. My argument is that the Aboriginal names of Canada's provinces and territories must become a pillar of the Canadian school curriculum in the struggle to de-stigmatize Indigenous languages. I argue that educators must become active on the policy committee for UNESCO’s Endangered Languages Program in order to revitalize the Canadian Indigenous Languages. I believe that the Indigenous epistemologies embedded within Indigenous languages be taught to non indigenous students in an effort to de-stigmatize Indigenous languages. I will prove this by creating a map of Canada with the Aboriginal names before European contact.
    Subjects: Aboriginal Place Names, Linguistic Genocide, Indigenous Maps
  3. Organizing Polar Science: Canada’s Emerging Antarctic Interests

    Title: Organizing Polar Science: Canada’s Emerging Antarctic Interests
    Creator: Dey Nuttall, Anita
    Description: The study takes, as a point of departure, the analysis of how governments have responded in organizational terms, through their national agencies concerned with science policy and logistics, to the shifting physical, environmental, socio-economic and geopolitical challenges facing the polar regions.
    Subjects: Antarctic Treaty, Antarctic research, Polar science, Science policy
    Date Created: 2009/11/28
  4. The Need for Integrated Resource Management to Achieve a Sustainable Forest Management Regime: A Case of the Forest Management in Alberta, Canada [持続可能な森林経営に向けた統括的資源管理の必要性 —カナダ, アルバータ州の森林管理の実情から—]

    Title: The Need for Integrated Resource Management to Achieve a Sustainable Forest Management Regime: A Case of the Forest Management in Alberta, Canada [持続可能な森林経営に向けた統括的資源管理の必要性 —カナダ, アルバータ州の森林管理の実情から—]
    Creator: Hayashi, Naotaka
    Description: The forest management regime of Alberta, Canada, was reviewed in light of the three pillars of sustainable forest management: economic, social, and environmental values of forests. It was found that as long as the provincial policy is inclined to the pursuit of economic benefits derived from the short-term resource development in the boreal forests, it would be difficult to either maintain or enhance the social and environmental values of the forests at the same time. The boreal forests provide resources for timber production, oil and gas development, and a quality of life for forest-dependent community members including Aboriginal peoples. This leads to the need for integrated resource management (IRM) through public participation, which takes into consideration all stakeholders’ benefits in the region and ecosystem protection. In addition, a comparison was made between zoning and the management regime based on the principles of Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), both of which are applications of IRM. As a result, differences were found in terms of achieving a balance between the three forest values. It was also found that planning IRM needs transparent and participatory decision-making processes, which enables all stakeholders not only to claim their benefits, but also to discuss how to achieve a balance between three forest values.
    Subjects: Public participation, Zoning, 生態系を重視した森林管理, Forest Stewardship Council, 石油・天然ガス産業, 市民参加, Oil and gas industry, Ecosystem management, ゾーニング, 森林管理協議会, Sustainable forest management
    Date Created: 2008/11/05
  5. University of the Arctic Digital Library: Update 2012

    Title: University of the Arctic Digital Library: Update 2012
    Creator: Campbell, Sandy
    Description: The University of the Arctic Digital Library project is an ongoing project in which PLC takes an interest. Some Digital Library functions are now operational at a level, integrated into the Arctic Virtual Learning Tools environment. This session will report on the 2011 meeting in Tornio/Kemi and Rovaniemi, Finland and review the developments to date and the future expectations for the library. A proposal has been developed for the June 2012 Council Meeting to establish a lead institution that would be responsible for the Digital Library. Developments in the University of the Arctic, itself, will also be discussed.
    Subjects: University of the Arctic, Articles, Digital Libraries
    Date Created: 2012/06/01
  6. Proactive action for future generations: the case of a tree-planting project in South Greenland[次世代に可能性をつなげる行動 ─ 南グリーンランドの植林事業─]

    Title: Proactive action for future generations: the case of a tree-planting project in South Greenland[次世代に可能性をつなげる行動 ─ 南グリーンランドの植林事業─]
    Creator: Hayashi, Naotaka
    Description: A short essay about plantations in South Greenland 南グリーンランドの植林事業について
    Subjects: Qanasiassat, Arboretum, Sustainability, Transplanting, Narsarsuaq, Climate change, 気候変動, 樹木園, Kuussuaq, Plantation
    Date Created: 2011/06/21
  7. Gold Range Hotel, Yellowknife, Northwest Territories -- photograph

    Title: Gold Range Hotel, Yellowknife, Northwest Territories -- photograph
    Creator: Seale, Linda N.
    Description: The Gold Range Hotel in Yellowknife, NT, is a landmark building in the city and dates from the 1950s, replacing an earlier hotel and bar frequented by gold miners. Photograph taken March 2012.
    Subjects: Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, Hotels, Gold Range Hotel, Yellowknife, Northwest Territories
    Date Created: 2012/03/10
  8. Mainstream Media Publications and Northern Issues: 2008 Polar Libraries Colloquy Presentation

    Title: Mainstream Media Publications and Northern Issues: 2008 Polar Libraries Colloquy Presentation
    Creator: Johnston, Lindsay
    Subjects: Media, Polar bears
    Date Created: 2008/06/11
  9. Finding Canadian polar Indigenous studies in Medline

    Title: Finding Canadian polar Indigenous studies in Medline
    Creator: Campbell, Sandy
    Description: The polar library community has made much progress over the past thirty years in the development of bibliographic search tools that allow fast and easy access to publications about the Arctic and Antarctic. Many of us rely heavily on tools such as Arctic and Antarctic Regions to satisfy our need for information organized with a geographic focus. For Circumpolar health researchers, there is now the growing Circumpolar Health Bibliographic Database, a subset of the Arctic Science and Technology Information System (ASTIS), which is improving access to polar health materials. However, when conducting systematic review searches, searchers are required to be as comprehensive as possible, which means that all relevant subject databases must be searched, even if overlap is substantial. As a result, Medline must be searched as part of any systematic review search related to Indigenous health issues in Canada’s Arctic regions. While the MESH Subject Headings and Geographic Headings do supply some controlled vocabulary access, keywords must also be searched to make the search comprehensive. This goal of this project is to create a Medline search filter which will assure comprehensive retrieval of Canadian Indigenous materials
    Subjects: Indexing - Indigenous Peoples- Canada, Indexing - Ovid Medline, Search filters - Indigenous Peoples - Canada, Articles, Information storage and retrieval, Subject Headings - Indigenous Peoples - Canada, Indexing - Aboriginal Peoples - Canada
    Date Created: 2012/06/11
  10. A Collaborative Citizenship Based Water Treatment Program Empowers Albertans as Agents of Their Communities

    Title: A Collaborative Citizenship Based Water Treatment Program Empowers Albertans as Agents of Their Communities
    Creator: Anna Wilson MEd.
    Description: Abstract This paper will examine the question of why Alberta does not follow Health Canada’s regulations for safe drinking water and the health implications for Albertans who drink this water. A literature review of documents from the Canadian Government, the Alberta Government, Health Canada, the World Health Organization (WHO), and The Safe Drinking Water Foundation (SDWF) will provide scientific evidence to answer these questions. I will present the current chemical properties of drinking water in Aboriginal Communities in Northern Alberta, rural communities, towns and major cities. Then I will present the solution for treating contaminated water in rural and urban Alberta communities, which is the chemical free reverse osmosis water treatment method from the Safe Drinking Water Foundation. I will analyze these documents and the government politics and policy embedded in these documents using a theoretical framework of the subaltern view. I will prove that the health of all Albertans is at risk from drinking urban tap water. Albertans can develop a slow accumulation of intestinal parasites and colon cancer from ingesting tap water. I will prove that the Advanced Aboriginal Treatment Team’s method of chemical free reverse osmosis is the best method for cleansing Alberta’s urban tap water from the 100 micrograms per litre of cancer causing trio-halomethanes, parasites and viruses (Peterson & Fricker, 2008, p.14). I will prove that the All citizens have the right to know what contaminants are in their drinking water supply and have a right to make political decisions regarding how their water will be purified.
    Subjects: Community Agency, Safe Drinking Water, Human Rights